Dec 14

Hat tip: Climategate

1 person likes this post.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
Oct 14

Accuracy In Media reports:

“Environmental journalism” is an oxymoron, and if that wasn’t obvious already, it is after the Society of Environmental Journalists last week shielded a politician from one of its own members. The politician in question was none other than former Vice President Al Gore.

Phelim McAleer, a co-producer of the forthcoming movie “Not Evil Just Wrong” and a current editorial client of mine, attended the annual SEJ conference in Wisconsin, and for the first time in years, Gore took questions in a public forum. McAleer asked Gore whether he intended to correct the factual errors in his global warming movie An Inconvenient Truth.

Gore bobbed and weaved rhetorically, and when McAleer pressed for answers (as all good journalists should), Gore’s SEJ allies intervened. Two members of the group physically tried to remove McAleer from the microphone, and the organizers eventually cut the sound.

The journalists who ran interference for Gore, including Baltimore Sun environment reporter Tim Wheeler, defended their actions. Wheeler wrote on the SEJ blog that he was just enforcing the rules for the question-and-answer session by refusing to let McAleer monopolize the mic.

But the reality is that Wheeler and his colleagues violated at least two principles of the ethics code drafted by the Society of Professional Journalists:

  • Support the open exchange of views, even views they find repugnant.
  • Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable.

It’s clear from their coverage that environmental journalists find the views of skeptics like McAleer repugnant, but that’s precisely why they should have let him press Gore for answers in a public forum. McAleer showed himself to be vigilant and courageous in holding Gore accountable for spreading propaganda in public schools, and he deserved the SEJ’s support.

Be the first to like.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
Oct 13

Not Evil, Just Wrong filmmaker Phelim McAleer made the media rounds yesterday, including this appearance on Neil Cavuto’s show, Your World.

McAleer is the journalist who asked Al Gore an inconvenient question about the errors in Gore’s science fiction movie, An Inconvenient Truth.

Be the first to like.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
Oct 12

John Fund, writing in The Wall Street Journal comments on Not Evil, Just Wrong filmmaker Phelim McAleer’s encounter with Al Gore which ended with McAleer’s microphone being turned off as McAleer pressed Gore to answer an inconvenient question about the errors in Al Gore’s science fiction movie, An Inconvenient Truth:

Mr. Gore swatted away the question by claiming the judge had found in favor of his film. He also briefly addressed one of the objections to his film by scoffing at claims that polar bears weren’t an endangered species. Mr. McAleer tried to follow up by pointing out that polar bear populations were increasing, but his microphone was quickly cut off. Organizers insisted that several other people were waiting with questions and they had to move on.

In fact, Mr. Gore didn’t answer Mr. McAleer’s question and was wrong on the facts. The British court found that An Inconvenient Truth “is a political film” riddled with scientific errors. The judge also held that requiring the film to be shown in schools would be a violation of law, unless accompanied by “guidance” pointing out its errors. The judge concluded that the claimant who objected to the film “substantially won this case by virtue of my finding that, but for the new guidance note, the film would have been distributed in breach of sections 406 and 407 of the 1996 Education Act.”

As for polar bears, Mr. McAleer was correct: Surveys show their numbers are increasing.

Mr. McAleer, whose film premiers this weekend, says he’s more disappointed in the environmental journalists who give Mr. Gore cover than in the former vice president. Mr. Gore is simply doing what any propagandist with a weak case would do — avoiding serious debate or exchange. To quote the late William F. Buckley, “There is a reason that baloney rejects the grinder.”

Be the first to like.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
Oct 11

As noted here on Friday, journalist and Not Evil Just Wrong filmmaker Phelim McAleer had his microphone turned off while he was pressing Al Gore to answer questions about the errors in An Inconvenient Truth.

Great McAleer quote from the video:

“At the Society for Environmental Journalists, the reaction of the journalists…was to shut down the journalist, and protect the politician.”

Be the first to like.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
preload preload preload