Jun 10

in2dwww tweets: ‘Hey Al Gore, where the f— is the warm weather? June 9th in L.A, 63 degrees mid-day. Don’t backpedal and call it climate change!’

By Editor Al Gore, Twitter Comments Off on in2dwww tweets: ‘Hey Al Gore, where the f— is the warm weather? June 9th in L.A, 63 degrees mid-day. Don’t backpedal and call it climate change!’

tweet

Be the first to like.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
Jun 06

Via Watts Up With That:

From the “weather is not climate” department, this report from TV station KXMC in North Dakota:

Jun 6 2009 2:49PM
KXNewsTeam

Snow falls in western ND, in June

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) Snow has fallen in Dickinson in June, the first time in nearly 60 years the city has seen snow past May.

National Weather Service meteorologist Janine Vining in Bismarck says there were unofficial reports of a couple of inches of snow in Dickinson on Saturday.

Be the first to like.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
Jun 05

“Telling our children about climate change could leave them…traumatised.” Huh? If the child is 11 yrs. old or less, tell them the earth has cooled since their birth.

By Editor child abuse, Global cooling, Letter to the Editor Comments Off on “Telling our children about climate change could leave them…traumatised.” Huh? If the child is 11 yrs. old or less, tell them the earth has cooled since their birth.

There’s much alarmist hand-wringing in this article at the UK’s Guardian over how to talk to children about climate change with out terrifying the little crumb-crunchers to death.  It’s titled, ‘Why don’t we stop hurting the planet?’, with the sub-head: Telling our children about climate change could leave them angry, worried or even traumatised. So when and how should we do it, asks Leo Hickman.

Why not tell kids the truth, including the inconvenient truth? Why not put it in context that kids can relate with?

My daughter was born in 1998. When I told her that 1998 was indeed a warm year, but that the earth has cooled since her birth, she replied:

“Well, what’s everybody so worried about!”

She had no clue that the earth had been cooling for that long. Kids today are exposed to the alarmist message of melting ice caps, drowning polar bears, Category 11 hurricanes, and what they take away from that is that the earth is constantly getting hotter, every day, every week, and every year – non-stop.

The alarmists in their classrooms and on the TV don’t bother to tell them that the earth has cooled for eleven years – because it might cause them to check their premises. Which might cause them to change their mind. And we can’t have that, can we?

Be the first to like.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
Jun 04

The Kent (Washington) Reporter:

Called “Black and White” and written by fifth- and sixth-grade teacher Bob Johnson, the play focuses on a group of penguins who discover a cell phone.

According to Johnson, two of the penguins have “inclinations” toward being scientists and learn about global warming, which they then try to tell the rest of the group.

“Most of the other penguins don’t believe her,” Johnson said, of one of the main characters, during a break in rehearsals.

In Act 2, however, a pair of polar bears arrive from the Arctic and confirm that yes, the ice is melting where they live.

Johnson said the play, which features 38 students in various roles, is a multi-media presentation featuring several videos that help move the play along.

“We interact with the videos,” Johnson said.

“Black and White” is the sixth play Johnson has written for performance at the school and he said this one was inspired by a Discovery Channel special highlighting the plight of polar bears as Arctic ice melts due to increasing global temperatures.

“It stuck with me for years,” he said of the polar bears.

Though a controversial issue by some standards, Johnson said that while this production’s title is a play on both the outfit worn by the penguins and the growing scientific evidence supporting a warming planet, the message is not heavy-handed.

“We don’t want to preach,” he said, “but we want to make you aware of what’s going on.”

“The message is about helping the polar bears,” said Meaghen Schneider, 10, a fifth-grader.

“I think at the end the polar bears and the penguins are trying to convince the people in the audience about global warming and how to deal with it,” agreed Jazmin Caliman, 12, a sixth-grader.

I wonder if Johnson, the teacher, bothered to tell the students that the earth has cooled since these students were born? I doubt it.

Be the first to like.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
May 26

Here’s climatologist Philip Mote’s full quote offer to wager as reported by The Oregonian:

“I’m willing to bet large sums of money that we will have a bottom in this cool period,” he said, “and we’ll see the long-term trend again.”

The quote was contained in a March 20, 2008 article written by Michael Milstein for The Oregonian titled, “You call this global warming ? Uh, yeah”, which The Oregonian published amidst a particularly cold winter of 2007/2008 to reassure the local global warming alarmists that the world was still going to end at the hands of man-made global warming.

An excerpt:

This winter has been the coldest in the northern Oregon Cascades since 1993. Snow is piling up on Mount Hood. The past two winters in the Willamette Valley have been the coolest in more than a decade.

Globally, it was the coldest winter since 2001, according to the National Climatic Data Center. Sea ice even made a bit of a comeback after a dramatic melt-off last summer.

So is global warming a thing of the past?

Maybe for the time being, scientists say, but probably not over the longer term. One or even two years isn’t nearly enough time to indicate a climate trend, researchers say.

In the short window of a few months, routine shifts in weather such as the one the Northwest is experiencing now –driven by a well-known climate cycle known as La Nina –easily overwhelm whatever trends might be gripping the globe over years or decades.

The cool resurgence is fueling arguments by global warming skeptics that natural forces, not human factors such as greenhouse gases, dominate the climate.

But Northwest climate scientists say it’s a matter of short-term versus long-term perspective. The cool winter doesn’t mean there’s no warming trend, they say. Any trend remains subtle and is simply hidden for the time being.

“As you move to smaller and smaller time scales, it gets harder and harder to see the effect of rising temperatures,” said Philip Mote, a climate scientist at the University of Washington who was lead author of a recent international report on global climate change. “If La Nina goes away and the long-term temperatures are still below average, I’ll eat my hat.”

Mote, Washington’s state climatologist, said the past three months do seem unusually cool, within the perspective of the past 10 years.

Mote said that this winter does not change projections by his University of Washington research group that temperatures will inexorably rise, over the long term, by 0.2 to 1 degree Fahrenheit per decade.

“I’m willing to bet large sums of money that we will have a bottom in this cool period,” he said, “and we’ll see the long-term trend again.”

For the record, Mote is now the director of the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, and become a professor in the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University – which is to say that he replaced man-made global warming skeptic George Taylor, who held the equivalent position until he was forced out by the Green Governor Ted Kulongoski.

There’s no evidence that anyone ever took Mote up on his offer to wager, and fourteen months later we still don’t “have a bottom in this cool period”.

GORE LIED note: No link is available to the March 20, 2008 article from The Oregonian, as the entire article has disappeared from the internet, but still exists on The Oregonian’s archives that I have access to via my local library.  However, the first portion of the article was excerpted on this Oregonian blog, with no link to the entire article.

Be the first to like.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share
Tagged with:
preload preload preload