Jul 02
No cap & trade!

No cap & trade!

The Wall Street Journal’s Kimberley Strassel tells the now familiar tale of “suppressed” EPA employee, Alan Carlin, and thinks that James Hansen ought to be defending Carlin.  She’s got a point.

Wherever Jim Hansen is right now — whatever speech the “censored” NASA scientist is giving — perhaps he’ll find time to mention the plight of Alan Carlin. Though don’t count on it.

Mr. Hansen, as everyone in this solar system knows, is the director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Starting in 2004, he launched a campaign against the Bush administration, claiming it was censoring his global-warming thoughts and fiddling with the science. It was all a bit of a hoot, given Mr. Hansen was already a world-famous devotee of the theory of man-made global warming, a reputation earned with some 1,400 speeches he’d given, many while working for Mr. Bush. But it gave Democrats a fun talking point, one the Obama team later picked up.

Read the rest at the Journal.

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Jun 23

Don’t forget that Hansen takes part in these protests while he’s on a paid vacation funded by myself and my fellow Americans.

From the YouTube notes:

Daryl Hannah, NASA scientist James Hansen and former W.Va. Congressman Ken Hechler were among 31 people arrested at a non-violent protest of mountaintop removal coal mining near Massey Energy’s Goals Coal processing plant on June 23, 2009.

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Jun 23

Not that James Hansen’s arrest was a surprise, since that was his goal.

Via Climate Depot, SFGate’s Thin Green Line is reporting:

Actress Daryl Hannah was arrested this afternoon in West Virginia along with NASA climatologist James Hansen, local activist Michael Brune of Rainforest Action Network, Goldman Prize winner Judy Bonds, 94-year-old former U.S. Representative Ken Hechler and more than a dozen others.

They were protesting at an elementary school threatened by a 2.8-billion-gallon coal sludge impoundment where coal dust in the air exceeds acceptable limits. Protestors trespassed on land owned by coal giant Massey Energy.

The protest is part of a string of increasingly dramatic actions objecting to the Obama Administration’s announcement that the EPA will reform, but not abolish, mountaintop removal mining. Later this week, Congress will host a hearing titled, “The Impacts of Mountaintop Removal Mining on Water Quality in Appalachia.”

Many will now (and have) called for Hansen to be fired from his post at NASA. As noted on our post of March 18, 2009, Hansen will likely offer up the same lame excuse that he does his protesting while he’s on vacation. An excerpt from his video interview during a coal plant earlier this year:

Interviewer: Are you here as an employee of NASA?

James Hansen: No! Of course not. I’m here, I’m on vacation today.

Interviewer: You’re here as a private citizen then?

Hansen: Yes, of course.

Interviewer: Some people are going to say, “But you’re James Hansen, you’re always, you’re always identified with NASA”, and they’re saying you’re splitting hairs.

Hansen: I’m also a Columbia University adjunct professor, I mean I, uh, haven’t given up my rights as a US citizen, and freedom of speech is one of them.

The video of that protest earlier this year:

Note that the interviewer seems unconvinced by Hansen’s lame excuse.

I wonder how many paid vacation days Hansen has left for this year?

I also wonder if I’m the only person who is bothered by the fact that Hansen is going on these little adventures courtesy of our tax dollars?

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Jun 17

To paraphrase Tom Nelson, more raving madness from James Hansen.

The following exchange can be found at about 8:30 in the video.

Softball question for James Hansen:

…I wonder if that’s not another part of the reason that the public has a certain trouble connecting this is ’cause we in the press for so long mimicking you, with all due respect, in the scientific world.  Most of your models were talking about the year 2100 as when we would REALLY feel the impacts, and hasn’t climate change arrived 100 years sooner than you scientists expected?

To which Hansen deadpans:

…The climate models were not, uh, are more sluggish than the real world has turned out to be.

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